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Obesity: a representative animation

Posted by iskanbasal on July 28, 2007

This free full text article of the New England Journal of Medicine about obesity includes an interesting animation that decribes how obesity could be considered an epidemic; how it spreads in a certain way and how people can influence behaviour of each other.

Clinical cases has some interesting posts on the subject, one is this and the second is here with the presentation of a video.

Here below is the abstract of the NEJM article:

Nicholas A. Christakis, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., and James H. Fowler, Ph.D.

ABSTRACT

Background The prevalence of obesity has increased substantially over the past 30 years. We performed a quantitative analysis of the nature and extent of the person-to-person spread of obesity as a possible factor contributing to the obesity epidemic. Methods We evaluated a densely interconnected social network of 12,067 people assessed repeatedly from 1971 to 2003 as part of the Framingham Heart Study. The body-mass index was available for all subjects. We used longitudinal statistical models to examine whether weight gain in one person was associated with weight gain in his or her friends, siblings, spouse, and neighbors. Results Discernible clusters of obese persons (body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], ≥30) were present in the network at all time points, and the clusters extended to three degrees of separation. These clusters did not appear to be solely attributable to the selective formation of social ties among obese persons. A person’s chances of becoming obese increased by 57% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6 to 123) if he or she had a friend who became obese in a given interval. Among pairs of adult siblings, if one sibling became obese, the chance that the other would become obese increased by 40% (95% CI, 21 to 60). If one spouse became obese, the likelihood that the other spouse would become obese increased by 37% (95% CI, 7 to 73). These effects were not seen among neighbors in the immediate geographic location. Persons of the same sex had relatively greater influence on each other than those of the opposite sex. The spread of smoking cessation did not account for the spread of obesity in the network. Conclusions Network phenomena appear to be relevant to the biologic and behavioral trait of obesity, and obesity appears to spread through social ties. These findings have implications for clinical and public health interventions.
Source Information
From the Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston (N.A.C.); the Department of Medicine, Mt. Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, MA (N.A.C.); the Department of Sociology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (N.A.C.); and the Department of Political Science, University of California, San Diego, San Diego (J.H.F.). (Escuse me my english errors).

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